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sunstone

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Reply with quote  #76 
That was my feeling Teresa!
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“Breed type is such an elusive thing… It is something that can’t be taught but it can be learned. Even when type is present to the fullest, one person may see it and the person next to him may see nothing at all. It is clearly visible – yet defies description.” Richard Beauchamp

Barrie & The Sunstone Crew
Sunstone Mastiffs, Ca.
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sunstone

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Reply with quote  #77 
Nope, same vet.

For us this started with a very small crusty area in the crease between his testicles and thigh. I didn't think anything about it really, Rocco spent his days outside playing VERY HARD most of the day and a LOT of time excavating lol!

Then, we had a flea outbreak and I was bathing everyone at least once a week and that's when it spread, like wildfire! Meanwhile, we had a horrible heatwave and all of my dogs had to be crated most of the day, then, add insult to injury, I had 5 girls in heat!

So, in total, Rocco dropped around 40 pounds (he was my hardest keeper to begin with, extremely active boy, typically put away about 12-15 cups kibble daily ) and was suddenly covered in this 'ick'. Started him on cephalexin, and that did nothing.

When we first went to the vet, he had these oozing nasty sores, his front legs were swollen and weeping and he was on his way out. My vet thought either Valley Fever or cancer, so we began fluconazole and sent off the titer for VF. The fluconazole really didn't do much and the titer for VF came back negative (which is a whole can of worms unto itself because MANY Mastiffs with diagnosed VF NEVER titer for it).

Then we tested for cancer and NOTHING (well, of course, thank G-d)!

Meanwhile, I had been bathing (and scrubbing him every other day) which was keeping the ick at bay but no more. The swelling in his legs was still happening intermittently (again, could have pointed to VF), and I was pretty sure I was losing him. This beautiful boy had now dropped almost 50 pounds and barely had the energy to go pee by himself, let alone play . . .

After talking to both Teresa and Misty (and a few other people), I upped the baths to daily (which was just horrible to do because of the pain it was causing him) and tried to get him back to the vet for a culture, went back in, and was told it wasn't possible, that they would have to do a biopsy which would require a general anesthetic, which was something I didn't want to do. So, off we went to another vet, who recommended an internist and a dermatologist but said there just wasn't enough oozing going on to do a culture. 

Back to my regular vet, re-ran bloodwork, and tried to come up with a game plan in order to get a culture. The plan was to not bathe him through the weekend (the appointment was on a Thursday) in the hopes he would ooze enough by Monday, sure enough, it worked (just barely)! We decided at that point that since the cephalexin wasn't working we would switch to doxycyclin. Since I live in the land of fruits, nuts and cowboys, it took almost a week to get anything back on the culture, but in the meanwhile I was seeing improvement, not so much in his skin clearing, but the swelling was gone completely and his energy level was improving.

Sure enough, the culture came back as MRSP, with E. Coli and something else for good measure, it showed that he needed to be treated with Amoxycillin and Doxycylin which explained why there was some improvement.

So, got all of his meds last night, fingers crossed and prayers said that we have success! I have to tell you that after 3 months of not knowing what was going on, and sleeping in the kitchen floor with my boy who was clearly dying, horrid as the diagnosis may be it's still FAR, FAR BETTER than not knowing!

I started a Facebook group called MRSP Dogs, I know we can't be alone.

In speaking to the pharmacist yesterday, I asked if she had any advice for me and her response was "well, this is what my friend does with her dog . . . "








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“Breed type is such an elusive thing… It is something that can’t be taught but it can be learned. Even when type is present to the fullest, one person may see it and the person next to him may see nothing at all. It is clearly visible – yet defies description.” Richard Beauchamp

Barrie & The Sunstone Crew
Sunstone Mastiffs, Ca.
http://www.sunstonemastiffs.com
Sunstone Designs
Canine Inspired Art & Jewelry
http://www.sunstonedesigns.com
Let's Bring Green Girl Home!
http://greengirl.shedenara.com
OsoBodacious

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Reply with quote  #78 
Glad you have a diagnosis Barrie, but very sorry you have to deal with MRSP.

That's what Kizzy had in her foot.  She too, was tested for everything under the sun from fungi, bacteria, systemic issues, cancer, and on and on.  I don't know if it was because of the location on the bottom of her foot or not, but we never did get the infection under control and we ended up having to amputate two toes.

I am in agreement with the others - use the "little guns" as long as the c&s shows the bacteria to be susceptible to them.  Save the "big guns" for only if you have to.

Glad you found a vet willing to use a combination of more than one antibiotic too.  The asinine vets at the Derm. clinic at Auburn couldn't see past the end of their noses and refused to combine two (or more).  When my local vet decided to combine a couple, we started seeing some improvement, but in our case, it was never enough and after 2 toes became involved, we decided to amputate before more were affected.

I will keep you and Roscoe in my thoughts and prayers.  I hope he starts to improve rapidly now.

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sunstone

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Reply with quote  #79 
Thanks Terri!

One of the things I love about my vet is that he is usually very open minded and willing to experiment. I said MRSP about 3 weeks ago and he wasn't going for it, kept feeding me the 7 year old giant breed, it's got to be cancer stuff, so when the cancer testing came back negative, he was stumped, and I think a little bit more willing to experiment.

The big issue for us was that although he had the lesions and pustule things, he was so dry every time I took him to the vet there just wasn't enough to culture from my understanding.

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“Breed type is such an elusive thing… It is something that can’t be taught but it can be learned. Even when type is present to the fullest, one person may see it and the person next to him may see nothing at all. It is clearly visible – yet defies description.” Richard Beauchamp

Barrie & The Sunstone Crew
Sunstone Mastiffs, Ca.
http://www.sunstonemastiffs.com
Sunstone Designs
Canine Inspired Art & Jewelry
http://www.sunstonedesigns.com
Let's Bring Green Girl Home!
http://greengirl.shedenara.com
Misty

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Reply with quote  #80 
I have to say Barrie, there are a lot of vets that will just blow off the dog owners because they think we know nothing.  I keep hearing it from all these people.  It takes a firm conviction to get things done some times.  I really see this issue becoming way to escallated in our breed, it's scarry.  I got lucky with my vet, plus I didn't really give her the chance to say NO to me.  I took charge of what I wanted Camo tested for, plus I gave her the documentation regarding piodermas in mastiffs to back it up, so she knew I wasn't bluffing.  Even after we got the final diagnosis, and the culture was back on Camo, I still kept feeding her ideas, and Dr. Bonstead was amazing.  She admitted MRSP wasn't something she knew a lot about, and enlisted the help of vets who did, and new how to treat it correctly.  In addition, I had my resident Pharmacist aka Teresa explaining what meds had better results on fighting this.

I'm still trying to understand why your vet didn't just do a punch biopsy..  You don't have to nock the dog out, they just numb the erea, and take a plug.  You'd get the same results as a skin scrapping and it shows the level of damage to the skin.

Just remember the drugs you have your boy on are pretty light weight.  They may get him started on recovering, but MRSP is nasty, and you may have to resourt to some bigger guns to get him over this.

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sunstone

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Reply with quote  #81 
That's my biggest nagging issue right now Misty, is knowing that his drugs are lightweight, on the one hand that's great IF it really works, on the other hand . . . well, let's not go there, he's making headway!  
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“Breed type is such an elusive thing… It is something that can’t be taught but it can be learned. Even when type is present to the fullest, one person may see it and the person next to him may see nothing at all. It is clearly visible – yet defies description.” Richard Beauchamp

Barrie & The Sunstone Crew
Sunstone Mastiffs, Ca.
http://www.sunstonemastiffs.com
Sunstone Designs
Canine Inspired Art & Jewelry
http://www.sunstonedesigns.com
Let's Bring Green Girl Home!
http://greengirl.shedenara.com
Teresa

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Reply with quote  #82 
So, here's the deal. Doxycycline will hit about 75% of the initial MRSP infections (at least the percentages in our hospital on MRSA which is very similar;making the other 25% completely resistant), but that 75% number goes down pretty rapidly as the dog in on the drug longer and longer. That is what makes the methicillin resistant staphs so horrible. It "learns" to be resistant. It is also the reason it is SO important to get the dog (or human) on the right antibiotic and treat FULLY for the infection. All of our resistant strains of bacteria are from over exposure of antibiotics that are not given for the right things for the right amount of time.
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sunstone

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Reply with quote  #83 
Thanks for that breakdown Teresa, fingers still crossed here! He's been eating like it's going out of style which is a HUGE relief! Those of you who have been following his story on FB know what a huge pain he's been with the eating, to the tune of almost 50 lost pounds . . . As of yesterday he had gained 3 in the last week!

I started experimenting with honey that I had in the cupboard, any old UNPASTEURIZED honey, and these are the results thus far, crappy picture, I am sorry.

Left to right:

day 1 pre honey
day 2 24 hours after starting honey
day 3 48 hours after starting the honey AND after a bath


Attached Images
Name: 552672_10151290655017474_289169568_n_(2).jpg, Views: 126, Size: 107.18 KB



__________________
“Breed type is such an elusive thing… It is something that can’t be taught but it can be learned. Even when type is present to the fullest, one person may see it and the person next to him may see nothing at all. It is clearly visible – yet defies description.” Richard Beauchamp

Barrie & The Sunstone Crew
Sunstone Mastiffs, Ca.
http://www.sunstonemastiffs.com
Sunstone Designs
Canine Inspired Art & Jewelry
http://www.sunstonedesigns.com
Let's Bring Green Girl Home!
http://greengirl.shedenara.com

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