Mastiff Chat
Register  |   |   |  Calendar
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Thor916

Registered:
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #1 
Hey everyone! My first time in one of these chat rooms, hoping to get some advice.

My english mastiff is 150 lbs, aprox 17 mos old. I adopted him in July. He's very sweet but doesn't understand his size. When I take him to the dog park he barrels towards other dogs, putting them on instant defense and the growling begins.

Thor has NEVER showed any signs of aggression, but he's soo intimidating and I don't trust any animal 100%. It worries me that, because of his size, he'll intimidate the wrong dog and a fight will break out.

Any advice you have to get Thor to not charge after dogs and people? I'm still working on not pulling on a leash. But he's so hyper! I thought these dogs were suppose to be lazy? LOL He has the energy of a baby [love]

My thoughts are to walk him allot and keep making visits to the dog park, hoping he takes the advise of the other dogs, and backs down a bit. I feel bad for the other dog owners, they look so terrified when they see him barreling towards their dog....


Banana

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 455
Reply with quote  #2 
Ha ha, of course he doesn't know his size or strength. Savanna just turned 9 and she has finally settled down. I have called her the hyper Mastiff forever. That "spirit" is amazing. My two cents is to take him for a good long walk, get him very tired and then go to the dog park. I bet he won't care as much.
Also, keep his favorite treats in your pocket, he may choose to stay close to you.
Keep in mind, you may not know his full history. Baby steps.
We have had our baby girl since 9 weeks and we know she is a people dog. We don't bother taking her around other dogs.
Got to love them

__________________
SavannaBananna
Misty

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,128
Reply with quote  #3 
It's clear your dog needs some training. All my dogs go thru obediance train from the time they are puppies until they have wonderful manners & they know how to act in public. You can't let a dog that big run amuck.
__________________
Slave to Mastiffs:
UKC CH, Int. CH, BGCH, Lazy D's Southern Mossy Oak, CD, RN, CGCA, TDI, TT, WDX "Camo"
Magical Autumn Oaks Blazing Mirage of Oasis, CGC "Mia"
Autumn Oaks To Infinity And Beyond "Buzz"
conniej

Registered:
Posts: 25
Reply with quote  #4 
I'm a big proponent of obedience training as well--it is a terrific opportunity to have your dog meet other dogs and people in a much more controlled environment. Laoise absolutely loved her classes--not only did she learn manners, but she (and I) learned to better read other dogs and got to visit with all those people (her favorite part I think). She is a very social girl--thinks everyone should love her, but she had to learn and accept that she needs to wait for an invite before getting up close and personal, whether it be with a dog or a person.

Personally, I would hold off on the dog park--get his behavior assessed and under control, before putting him in a situation where there are so many distractions and unknown factors. 

__________________
Connie
rwatsonaz

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 263
Reply with quote  #5 
Thor- 
  First welcome to this forum, it is one of the best on the ' InterWeb" with a lot of great advice and opinions that are 100% correct ( not really).... So, I will give my opinions.   I agree with Misty that some training is necessary.  Mastiff's are huge and honestly it is safe and smart to have that under your belt.  I have seen people pulled off of their feet by Giant Breed dogs, seriously.  I would look at a gentle leader or halti, your puppy will pitch a fit when you first put it on, but... it will work wonders.   No choking or damage to the throat.   Please seek a trainers advice on how to put it on your puppy.

  Now regarding dog parks.  I am not a personal fan of them, fact is, none of my Mastiff's ( Micah, Murphy, Nala, & Pebbles) have ever been to one.  I am very wary, when someone with a dog approaches me, and I have one of mine, and they say " Oh don't worry, I know my dog"... run.   Dog parks can be very dangerous because it is full of people, that " Know their dogs".   Second, you can pick up a disease or your dog can from feces or urine from other dogs, or they could step into a hole and damage a leg.   Mastiff's generally do not require a huge amount of exercise, they can get a huge amount just on a short walk.   I presume that one of the reasons you went or are going to a park is to socialize your puppy.  Socialization on any dog is something that is not done as it should be, that is one of the most important things you can do, to have a well balanced dog, not only mentally but physically.  I understand the energy part, Murphy & Pebbles just turned three and they tear around like a ghost is after them.   It is just going to take some time, I am sure your going to be a great dogger dad or mom.

  As stated, training is very important, not only will it help your pup to learn that you just can't do that, but, it will give you the opportunity to know your dog better and to bond further with them, I strongly recommend that.   I do not recommend training at Petsmart or stores like that, seek out a non aggressive trainer someone along the lines of a trainer we use in Phoenix, Brad Jaffe here is his web site to give you an idea http://dogological.com/  he is also on Facebook and can give you some excellent professional advice.   You will notice a very handsome male Mastiff- Brindle, that is Micah.

 All of the people on this forum honestly care about the breed, some are the best breeders in the US, there are some fantastic articles written here please take advantage of the information here, ask questions and enjoy your puppy, for many years to come

Rick


P.S.
Mastiff's don't start fights.... they end them



__________________
You can say any fool thing to a dog, and the dog will give you this look that says, `My God, you’re RIGHT! I NEVER would’ve thought of that!’
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.